After a nice breakfast (typical French with great bread) we backtracked a little as I wanted to see a village called SantAntononino. We were high in the mountains and as we took turn after turn we could see villages high on top of hills that we had just driven through across a valley or see the next village we would arrive at perched on top of a hill looking a long distance away but quickly driven into. We went back through Ile Rousse, a popular tourist stop packed with people and traffic as it is a sea side village in a beautiful setting with turquoise and dark blue water curving around the cliffs and beaches which we could see as we climbed again to find SantAntonino. The whole area gives me the feel of Provence with rocks and boulders everywhere, and many perched villages, although there is a lot more vegetation called maquis here in Corsica. The village was one of those built totally of rocks easily found here with winding climbing steets also of stone reminding me of Gordes. There wasn’t that much there to see other than the stellar view-just a few shops and places to eat. The only photos I took there were of our drinks:

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Corsica Cola-rather like RC but not very good. I had to give it a try though.

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Another type of Corsican beer. The head is on Corisca’s flag. Called the Moor’s head for reasons not clear but thought to be Arabic in origin from what I read.

We stopped to see a 12th century church inside a cemetery with primitive carvings on the outside in the area. Then we crossed what is called a desert here, altho ugh I’m not sure why. There were mainly rocks but there was vegetation, not sand with very little else to see. Maybe nothing can be grown there.

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These carvings look like something you’d see in South America to me.

We made our way up and then down many curves and twists (there were few roads that weren’t this way) to St Florent, a little harbor village which we didn’t like nearly as much as Calvi although Maurice had good memories of it when he went sailing with friends years ago around the island. It didn’t have the neat beaches and architecture of Calvi although there are apparently beaches to be found only not easily accessed.
Our hotel was interesting. When we first pulled in we were appalled as we entered an unpaved parking lot full of weeds and unfinished walls. We would have driven on and found another place but we had already payed for our room with a credit card. We went through a garden which badly needed weeding to a dirty, messy office. Thank goodness our room turned out to be clean and it had a/c and a TV so all was fine. They even served drinks in the evening with a few munchies on a porch with a view of children’s toys everywhere in the weed overrun yard and cleaning products and equipment on shelves with spiderwebs everwhere (I am a critical viewer of other people’s housekeeping) and we met everyone staying there. The owner of the hotel is a Harley Davidson owner and so was one of the guests. He told us about really delightful sounding but remote beaches but it would require a four wheeler or be a three hour walk. A nice little lady sat next to me at the “cocktail hour”. She and her husband were from Paris and she told me that they had come to Corsica several years ago and fallen in love with it. Then she told me that on her first trip she and her husband had circled the island on their Harley Davidson motorcycle. This surprised me as she certainly didn’t look the part of a biker babe sitting there with short gray hair cut in an old fashioned curly short style. I looked at her husband and he was more the type with a sleeveless t-shirt and beard. Just goes to show—you can’t judge a book by its cover.

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On another note, I’ve been awarded this award by Terry at the blog of Island Writer . Merci, Terry

Sideroads of Europe