A Week in Kent 10

The town of Canterbury was especially fascinating and we had an excellent walking tour given by a lady from the Information Office. Did you know that the word “canter” comes from the name Canterbury? It came about when the bells rang indicating that the gates to the city were going to close and when you speeded up your horse to arrive before it was too late you speeded your horse up and that speed of the horse became known as a canter. Who knew?


This funny crooked building was a bookstore.


Hidden inside a courtyard was this very old Relgious building still in use although much of it had been destroyed.


I love how they built it over the river.


Looking out from the chapel.


Later in the evening we returned to the cathedral for Evensong where we got to sit in the choir and listen to the boy’s choir. It was magnificent. And the organist at the closing played something that just vibrated my soul.


Afterwards we had dinner at a place down the street from the entry gate at a place called Deeson’s and the food was very good. Our waitress was very nice and I recognized her from a place called Tiny Tim’s where we had had tea earlier. It had a haunted room upstairs where ghosts of children had been “released” when renovation had been done and evidence of the children’s death had been found. We went into the room but got no ghostly vibes. The waitress told us she had never seen a ghost but that a guy who worked there had seen a little girl sitting on the stairs early one morning. We were too full for dessert but when I asked her what in the world a dessert I saw on the menu called Eton Mess was she brought us a sample. It was a mix of pieces of baked merengue, whipped cream and strawberries invented by a chef at Eaton, a boy’s school. It was good-something I may whip up myself one day.

8 thoughts to “A Week in Kent 10”

  1. Oh, I love that bookstore! Did you happen to go inside?! I don’t think I could have resisted the chance to check it out. πŸ™‚ I am thinking we are going to have to add this lovely town to our list to visit. I love traveling through your eyes.

  2. I am learning more and more as I read πŸ™‚ Your Eton Mess doesn’t look messy, to structured but I am sure it was tasty. !

    My husband’s family have been making this for years, I had never heard of it until I met him, mind you, I didn’t grow up in a typical English family..

    Have a google about, you will see lots of recipes and photos!

  3. I am learning more and more as I read πŸ™‚ Your Eton Mess doesn’t look messy, to structured but I am sure it was tasty. !

    My husband’s family have been making this for years, I had never heard of it until I met him, mind you, I didn’t grow up in a typical English family..

    Have a google about, you will see lots of recipes and photos!

  4. That dessert sounds delicious. Your blog post was educational, spooky and yummy all at the same time. I’ll have to tell my daughter about the horse canter.

  5. Wonderful photos — love the bookstore and the Eton mess – yum!

    We went to an English country wedding recently and they served mini-dessert thingies that were similar – meringue, cream, and strawberries – soooooo good (and a little bit messy but worth it!).

    Cheers.

  6. Lovely photos as always.
    You manage to make everything come alive in your descriptions and photos. I am really enjoying them.

  7. The bookstore looks like a wonderful place, I love old bookstores! I wonder why the building was so crooked, would be interesting to find out. Love the photo of the building over the water, you captured that one just beautifully.

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