Early One Morning

I walk with a friend two or three times a week very early, usually at 7 AM. It is still dark as the sun doesn’t rise until well after 8. I always have her text me when she is ready as one morning she overslept and I decided to head out on my own. The walk we always do is at the edge of a forest/park, around a lake and it isn’t very well lit which is fine when there are two of you but it was way too dark when I was by myself even though a jogger or two went by. I enjoy seeing shops still lit up in the area.

Here’s a look at the edge of the walk on a foggy morning.

An old time boulangerie, or bakery, still lit inside. This is actually a very well known place.

Kouglof for sale inside. It is a Christmas pastry which originated in Alsace.

A close up. I don’t think I have ever had one. I think it is sort of a fruit cake, although raisins are the only fruit.

A simple Christmas decoration in the window.

 

Eiffel Tower

On the way to, and leaving, the Quai Branly Museum, we saw the Eiffel Tower several times, always a pleasure.

This, on the way to the museum, is a new Greek Orthodox church. I’m not sure if you can visit it or not. I liked the exterior. I wish the sky had been blue. Right after I took this, it started pouring rain, along with some snow.

I saw this from inside the museum.

This view when we went to lunch at a cafe on the grounds. It was a good meal, just a bit pricy.

Because it’s December, the sun starts setting early which was nice for photos.

This was my best photo-sunset, Eiffel Tower, Seine, boat-what more could you need?

Museum

On a cold day with some rain and even a little snow, Maurice and I decided to visit the Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac Museum as neither of us have ever been. In fact, it’s in an area of Paris that I seldom visit near the Princess Diana memorial and not too far from the Eiffel Tower. Arts & Civilizations of Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas are what you see here, archeology type things which I love. They also had an exhibit of items from Peru.

 

The architecture of the building was incredible. This giant sculpture greets you as you enter.

You can see a bit of the architecture here.

As we walked up a winding path inside heading toward the exhibits, there was a sort of moving river of words and locations from all over the world. Once you reached the main exhibits there were curving walls and seating areas everywhere all covered with a smooth tan leather.

This art work, made of actual human skulls, was found in New Guinea. They were head hunters. They also treated women like property, often selling or stealing wives of other tribes. The men stayed in their own building where no women or children were allowed. They used shells and woven bird feathers for money. They had wooden flutes too for music. There were large carved columns placed on the tombs of the rulers, sort of like totem poles seen in Alaska and Canada.

This was in the Peru exhibit. The archeologists were surprised to find that many communities had women leaders such as this one. It was hard to find much in tombs and burial areas as the explorers from Spain took a lot, especially if it was made of gold. That’s sort of a large decorative ring on her nose which covers her mouth.

Luxembourg Garden

In my opinion, the Luxembourg Garden is one of the prettiest in Paris.

There are mums everywhere, especially in the urns.

An even larger urn.

A statue which looked like it was taking a selfie.

The Medici Fountain is so fabulous.

How decorative is this?

Here and There

Some photos taken around Paris:

Signs of Christmas are starting early around Paris.

Isn’t this cute? I love those reindeer.

Cour de Saint André des Arts, an ancient street with a lot of history having to do with the Revolution.

An entry into a little place serving seafood. I’ve never eaten there-maybe one day.

A decorated bike out on a side walk for a business.

Rodin

The Rodin Museum is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the death of the famous artist, Rodin. The museum is in what was once his home and studio and it is lovely. Because of the celebration, the museum entrance was free and there were even fireworks. We got there at 5:30 in the evening as the lights were turned on and there was a very romantic feeling seeing the lighting outside. Inside they had live music.

The front of the museum with Rodin’s signature lit up.

A painting of Rodin in his later years. He wasn’t a popular artist when he began as his art was too real, not very Greek as was popular in those days. He was very influenced by Michaelangelo after a trip to Italy and I think you can see it. He never actually did the actual sculptures that you see. He did the art in clay and then it was sculptured by experts working with him. He also did a lot of bronze works.

The statue of Rodin seen outside in the garden called, The Thinker, probably his most well known work.

The Kiss is very well known too. This was inside.

Some of his paintings looking very Impressionistic to me.

A pretty chandelier through a window from outside.

Even prettier from a distance.

At the back of the garden was this sign where they had the fireworks. We should have stayed to watch but went for drinks instead.