The Unexplored

We have a friend who was on a group tour composed of French tourists somewhere in the Middle East. Our friend was talking to a couple and asked them where in France they lived and they told her Paris and a place on the Atlantic Coast near La Rochelle that she wouldn’t have heard of and she said, “It wouldn’t be Chatelaillon, would it?” They were really shocked because she was right. She sent us their names and contact information and we met and have had several meals with them. The husband is especially interesting. He has worked all over the world and has lots of fascinating stories. He and his wife explore this area when they are here much more than we have. He is always telling us of interesting places to visit around here. One of these was a quarry, called la Pierre de Crazannes, near a village called Crazannes less than an hour from our place. People have been getting stone from here for centuries. It is especially popular because it is pure limestone without fossils in it which is what those doing sculptures want and many builders. Since the advent of cement in 1948 the quarry shut down but they have a little museum there and take you on a tour to see it all. It was very fascinating.

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When you drive up into the parking lot there are a bunch of huge sculpted statues which are done by resident artists. We saw them chiseling away while there.

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The entrance to the trail leading to the quarry.

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A look at some of the huge blocks of stone left. They did it the old fashioned way, chisel groves in the shape they wanted, put in dry wedges, put linen on top and pour on water. As the wedges expanded, the stone would fall out of its place in the wall, be put on a wagon pulled by six oxen where the stone would be moved to the nearby Charentes River. It was hard labor and the average age expectancy was 52 years. Boys started working there when they were nine moving rubble and were doing work by the time they were 16. It paid more than farming. Also, many men went blind working on the white limestone in the sun for years.

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The workers could only go down 18 meters as water was reached being near the river. It was a very tropical place as you can see-ferns all over the place.
We went for lunch to a nearby city called St Jean d’Angely where there was a church on the Camino de Santiago, the path followed by pilgrims walking through France to Spain.

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Here is what is left of an old abbey.

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Inside the church that is there now. Such a pretty floor.

3 thoughts to “The Unexplored”

  1. I have been following and enjoying your blog for many years. We will be visiting St Jean d’Angely overnight next month on our way from Auray in Brittany to Le Bugue in the Dordogne. Would you recommend the restaurant where you ate? Your advice would be very much appreciated. The old quarry sounds very interesting and if time permits we may be able to visit.

  2. How fun to make these discoveries! We live near a marble quarry–our kitchen counters are made of the local marble–but I haven’t yet visited it. You’re reminding me that it’s on my to-do list!

  3. How fascinating! And such luck to have new friends made in such an extraordinary way! Have fun exploring and sharing with us.

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